The Lumberjack

Talking about my snowflake generation

Right wingers love to call liberals “snowflakes,” a popular slang used to describe self-absorbed, thin-skinned millennials.

For instance, you might be labeled a snowflake if you are easily offended by someone calling another person “gay” or “retarded.” This is true even if the words were not intended to be a direct slur against the LGBT community or people with disabilities, but rather an alternative way to describe someone or something as being stupid.

“They’re only words,” comedian George Carlin said. “It’s the context that counts. It’s the user. It’s the intention behind the words that makes them good or bad. The words are completely neutral. The words are innocent. I get tired of people talking about bad words and bad language. Bullshit! It’s the context that makes them good or bad.”

In his 1990 HBO special “Doin’ It Again,” Carlin continues his rational bit about euphemisms, or “words that conceal reality.”

Though Carlin attempts to make sense about sugarcoating language to the point of total political correctness, derogatory expressions have been normalized for too long. This is especially true and accentuated in the days of the Trump administration.

Herds of hateful Americans have come out of the woodwork to protest against leftist values since Donald Trump took office. Many of them reckon it is their time to shine following the presidency of Obama, especially Richard Spencer. They also feel empowered to be blatant assholes, which are validated by mutually intolerant values.

It’s easy to call someone a snowflake, a narrow-minded redneck or what have you. We hear what we want to hear and impulsively strike with insults. It’s also easy to leave snide remarks about an entire community rather than understand why an individual is sticking up for marginalized people.

While it’s not necessary to be constantly politically correct, try to understand why it’s not appropriate to undermine those defending marginalized people by just labeling them snowflakes. It’s a case-by-case issue that demands good judgement and respect.